New Golf Balls Developed from Lobster Shells

The latest biodegradable golf balls have been developed from Lobster Shells‎ by David Neivandt, who is the professor of biological and chemical engineering at University of Maine and golfer and undergrad Alex Caddell. The New Golf ball is specially made for use on cruise ships. It is made by using empty shells of lobsters which cost just 19 cents per ball. It is first golf ball which is prepared with crushed lobster shells in conjunction with a biodegradable binder and coating.

New Golf Balls Developed from Lobster Shells

The new golf balls will solve two environmental problems. Neivandt said, “We're using a byproduct of the lobster-canning industry, which is currently miserably underutilized — it ends up in a landfill.” The retail value of the Biodegradable golf ball is just $1 per ball which is very low compared to other golf balls. Golf ball wasting is big problem in all over the world. Every year more than 300 million balls are lost or discarded in the United States.

The lobster balls perform fantastic alike to non-biodegradable, traditional, white-dimpled kind and work with both drivers and irons. It does not fly pretty as much as usual golf ball, but works with equal distance like other biodegradable golf balls. University of Maine has filed temporary copyright for the biodegradable polymer and lobster shell mixture to produce the balls. The material of the balls may also be used for other products like plant pots.

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